I'm fighting things I cannot see

startmetryingnow:

merkkultra:

do men have resting bitch faces as well or do they not have negative characteristics ascribed to them for putting on a neutral rather than a deliriously happy facial expression

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

18mr:

When you “don’t see race…” - CM
Via The New Yorker Magazine.

18mr:

When you “don’t see race…” - CM

Via The New Yorker Magazine.

thehpalliance:

aauw:

What does race have to do with a woman’s salary?
A lot. 
Today is Equal Pay Day. Join us in the fight for fair pay.

The odds are never in our favor.

thehpalliance:

aauw:

What does race have to do with a woman’s salary?

A lot.

Today is Equal Pay Day. Join us in the fight for fair pay.

The odds are never in our favor.

Our politics initially sprang from the shared belief that Black women are inherently valuable, that our liberation is a necessity not as an adjunct to somebody else’s may because of our need as human persons for autonomy. This may seem so obvious as to sound simplistic, but it is apparent that no other ostensibly progressive movement has ever consIdered our specific oppression as a priority or worked seriously for the ending of that oppression. Merely naming the pejorative stereotypes attributed to Black women (e.g. mammy, matriarch, Sapphire, whore, bulldagger), let alone cataloguing the cruel, often murderous, treatment we receive, indicates how little value has been placed upon our lives during four centuries of bondage in the Western hemisphere. We realize that the only people who care enough about us to work consistently for our liberation are us. Our politics evolve from a healthy love for ourselves, our sisters and our community which allows us to continue our struggle and work.

This focusing upon our own oppression is embodied in the concept of identity politics. We believe that the most profound and potentially most radical politics come directly out of our own identity, as opposed to working to end somebody else’s oppression. In the case of Black women this is a particularly repugnant, dangerous, threatening, and therefore revolutionary concept because it is obvious from looking at all the political movements that have preceded us that anyone is more worthy of liberation than ourselves. We reject pedestals, queenhood, and walking ten paces behind. To be recognized as human, levelly human, is enough.

Combahee River Collective

Quote is from the 1977 Combahee River Collective Statement in the “What We Believe” section, created by a group of Black lesbians (primary authors were Demita Frazier, Beverly Smith, and Barbara Smith) who are Black feminists who gathered to share Black feminist thought, scholarship and ideas for organization beyond politics solely focused on gender, but one intersectional. This was even before said concept was fully developed over a decade later by Kimberlé Crenshaw, but in hindsight intersectionality as a concept can be seen as far back as Sojourner Truth or more recent that the latter with Alice Walker and womanism

CRC had seven retreats between 1974-1980 and disbanded in 1980. Their work has been critical to the shaping of modern Black feminism because of how not only racism and sexism were focuses but also fighting heterosexism/homophobia, classism, imperialism and more. 

This is really important because it’s one of those moments where Black women, specifically, not a generic “women” that means “White” or a generic “Black” that means “men,” but Black women, as our own identity was articulated in anti-oppression scholarship and with experiences particular to Black womanhood itself. Rejecting binaries and erasure. 

(via gradientlair)

If you are 35 or younger - and quite often, older - the advice of the old economy does not apply to you. You live in the post-employment economy, where corporations have decided not to pay people. Profits are still high. The money is still there. But not for you. You will work without a raise, benefits, or job security. Survival is now a laudable aspiration.

Quoted from Sarah Kendzior’s “Surviving the Post-Employment Economy

“In the United States, nine percent of computer science majors are unemployed, and 14.7 percent of those who hold degrees in information systems have no job. Graduates with degrees in STEM - science, technology, engineering and medicine - are facing record joblessness, with unemployment at more than twice pre-recession levels. The job market for law degree holders continues to erode, with only 55 percent of 2011 law graduates in full-time jobs. Even in the military, that behemoth of the national budget, positions are being eliminated or becoming contingent due to the sequester.

It is not skills or majors that are being devalued. It is people.”

Her work is frank, speaking of a reality I hope that will never be mine. At the same time, it gives me a strange comfort to know that I am not alone.

(via sextus—empiricus)

yesthattoo:

So um petition because Sesame Street kind of partnered with Autism Speaks for a thing and no that is not okay.

disease-we-crave:

forsakensammy:

addark:

transrants:

bunreal:

I’ve noticed in the last few days the non-binary petition has been moving slower

let’s not give up on it please?

Please don’t let this fade out. Every single signature and boost counts.

Seriously. We have two weeks.

Please please please. This petition involves me, my friends, some of my family members, and so many others. This is so important.

We’ve done so well! Just a little bit more!! Please!!

jerikson:

TEN THINGS EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT RACE | PBS

teamocorazon:

smittened:

america-wakiewakie:

Our eyes tell us that people look different. No one has trouble distinguishing a Czech from a Chinese. But what do those differences mean? Are they biological?…

kindnessmatterss:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

peregrintoolc:

cismouse:

killcode102:

cismouse:

GUYS

THEY ARE TRYING TO TAKE THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT DOWN

AND REPLACE IT WITH THE BULLSHIT ENDANGERED SPECIES MANAGEMENT SELF-DETERMINATION ACT

THAT ALLOWS STATES TO DECIDE  IF THEY EVEN WANT TO ABIDE BY LAWS PROTECTING SPECIES AT ALL

AND DELISTS SPECIES AFTER ONLY FIVE YEARS

DOES ANYONE ELSE EVEN CARE

Source this

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Petition

image

SIGNAL BOOST!

 SIGNED!

the fact that “love your body” rhetoric shifts the responsibility for body acceptance over to the individual, and away from communities, institutions, and power, is also problematic. individuals who do not love their bodies, who find their bodies difficult to love, are seen as being part of the problem. the underlying assumption is that if we all loved our bodies just as they are, our fat-shaming, beauty-policing culture would be different. if we don’t love our bodies, we are, in effect, perpetuating normative (read: impossible) beauty standards. if we don’t love our individual bodies, we are at fault for collectively continuing the oppressive and misogynistic culture. if you don’t love your body, you’re not trying hard enough to love it. in this framework, your body is still the paramount focus, and one way or another, you’re failing. it’s too close to the usual body-shaming, self-policing crap, albeit with a few quasi-feminist twists, for comfort.

on “loving your body” (via silkchemise)

Pretty sure I’ve reblogged this before, but the sentiment still rings true. White supremacy makes me feel ugly as shit 99% of the time, and in the moments where I express my feelings of ugliness to feminist friends I am met with “why don’t you love yourself better?” “Omg you need a lots of self care” (which i dont always have the luxury of time/money for) and the worst of them, “Honey I think something’s really wrong with you, you need professional help :(“

Man, fuck that shit. The only “help” I need is good friends who want to help tear down the system with me. More often then not, however, my self-esteem dips and emotional responses to systemic oppressions usually result in my being told I’m not doing a good enough job of loving myself, instead of recognizing that we live in a world that makes it virtually impossible for marginalized (fat, brown, differently abled) folks to love our bodies in the first place.

(via tothedirigible)

Important

(via iamoffendedbecause)